The creation of ceramic sculpture and pottery allows me the opportunity to transform an artistic vision into a three-dimensional statement in clay.

Karena
sculpture & pottery
Firing Techniques

Horse hair sculpture and pottery is made using a mid fire porcelain clay body. Each is burnished twice using a smooth river stone and is fired in a low fire oxidation kiln. After firing, the piece is placed into a raku kiln and fired to about 1400° F. It is then removed, allowed to cool for a short time and then strands of horse hair are wrapped around the piece. The horse hair creates wonderful patterns and designs. Feathers and sugar may also be added to vary the process. These pieces are decorative and nonfunctional.

My raku sculpture and pottery is made with a grog based clay. It is fired one time and then glazed with a raku glaze. It is fired out doors in a raku kiln to about 1700° F. The piece is removed at this temperature and placed in a garbage can filled with sawdust and newspaper. The lid is placed on top to seal off the oxygen and is reduced in this atmosphere. After about 30 minutes the piece may be removed and allowed to cool in the open air. It may then be scrubbed to remove the excess soot and enhance the color. My raku pieces are decorative and nonfunctional.

My saggar fired sculpture and pottery is made using a porcelain clay body. Each piece is burnished twice using a smooth stone and then fired in the oxidation kiln. After firing, pots are placed individually in separate saggar fire containers with varied vegetation and fired again in either an indoor or outdoor kiln. I have used a variety of organic materials to create different colors on the pottery. They include: banana pills, coffee grounds, orange and lemon peels, daisies, pansies, marigolds, pampas, bahia, and wild grasses. The colors vary from pinks, to oranges and yellow to smoky greys and blacks. These pieces are also for decoration.

My pit fired sculpture and pottery is made using a grog based clay. Each piece is burnished and fired in a low fire oxidation kiln. After the piece is fired it is

nestled in sawdust in the pit. Copper carbonate and salt circle each piece. Layers of wood are placed on top of the pieces. Newspaper is placed on top and the fire is ignited. The pit is covered and allowed to burn and smoke overnight. The pieces are then removed from the ashes the next morning. These pieces are decorative and nonfunctional.

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